Nova Scotia has seven known active cases of COVID-19, with no new cases and one recovery reported in the latest government update. Two people are hospitalized in provincial COVID units, including one in ICU.

As of July 19, 73.8% of Nova Scotians have had at least one dose of vaccine, and 49.4% have had both jabs. Health officials say that to enter the final phase of the province’s reopening plan, 75% of Nova Scotians will need to be fully vaccinated. Nationwide, 69.6% of Canadians have had one shot, and 50.2% have had two.

COVID-19 has killed 26,504 Canadians, including 92 Nova Scotians.

Harry DeWolf, circa 1944. Photo: RCN

Remembering a naval hero
The namesake of one of the Royal Canadian Navy’s newest ships was born in Bedford. The scion of a family of ships’ brokers and shipping agents, it’s not surprising that Harry DeWolf spent his life at sea, but unlike his ancestors, he found his way in combat rather than trade. He was already a rising star in the navy when the Second World War broke out.

Ships under his command aided the British evacuation of Dunkirk, hunted Axis submarines, defended vital transatlantic convoys, and cleared the way for the Allied liberation of France.

“Canada’s most accomplished naval officer, commander ‘Hard Over Harry’ DeWolf, ended the Second World wearing both the Distinguished Service Order and the Distinguished Service Cross,” writes historian Bob Gordon. “His final combat command, HMCS Haida, earned the title, ‘fightingest ship in the Royal Canadian Navy.'”

Learn more in Gordon’s newest Halifax Magazine post.

Taking on ticks
Long-time Cape Breton doctor Ben Boucher, now retired to Halifax, recently published a book that he hopes will help people avoid some of the nasty illnesses he saw over his 35-year career.

The new work, It’s Not Just Ticks, It’s Not Just Lyme, draws on both his formal education and his on-the-job experience. He believes many people have been misdiagnosed over the years when it comes to Lyme Disease and other related infections.

“There’s quite a bit unknown about Lyme Disease. The point I’m making in it, is that it’s not just Lyme Disease, it’s not just ticks,” Boucher says. “Yes, ticks spread Lyme Disease, and they also spread other infections.”

Jake Boudrot interviews him for The Reporter.

Northern Pulp. Photo: Jackie Jardine

Northern Pulp saga continues
The owners of the now dormant Northern Pulp plant in Pictou County are proposing an overhaul to relaunch the mill as a less environmentally harmful operation.

Parent company Paper Excellence “acknowledges community concerns and wants to work with community members to build trust, finalize a transformation plan for a clean and sustainable mill, and develop a new relationship for the mill and community moving forward,” vice-president Graham Kissack says in a press release.

Provincial officials say the plan requires an environmental assessment.

“The changes outlined in the company’s project description would make the mill a substantially different facility than the one that had operated there previously,” says environment minister Keith Irving in a press release.

The Pictou Advocate reports.

Queens County Transit grows
Cars are still king in much of Nova Scotia, but people who live outside the urban areas are slowly seeing their transit options improve. In Queens County, the transit service has doubled its fleet to four vans, the newest of which can also easily transport wheelchair users.

“We’re very happy,” says Bill Smyth, past-president of Queens County Transit. “We’re expanding and growing and trying to meet the needs of our community.”

Kevin McBain has the story for LighthouseNow.

Need to know
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Halifax Magazine