In its latest update, the provincial government identified four new cases of COVID-19, raising the number of known active cases in Nova Scotia to 19.

The press release says that two of the new cases are in Central Zone and travelled together outside of Atlantic Canada. The other two cases are in the Northern Zone, household contacts of a previously reported case.

Nationally, the federal government reports that Canada currently has 31,725 known cases of COVID-19, including 9,467 in Quebec, 8,321 in Ontario, and 6,110 in Alberta. The disease has killed 10,331 Canadians.

Remembrance Day memories
Two years ago, Halifax Magazine photographer Tammy Fancy and I travelled to Belgium for events marking the centenary of the First World War’s conclusion, witnessing poignant commemorations on the very sites where conflict unfolded. As Nov. 11 approaches, we’re sharing memories of that visit and its many Nova Scotian connections. —T.J.A.

Photo: Tammy Fancy

When we arrived in Belgium in November 2018, one of the things we were keenest to see was an art installation with a Halifax connection.

From 2014 to 2018, thousands of people (including Tammy and me), helped create Coming World Remember Me, moulding some 600,000 clay sculptures.

They represent the 600,000 people killed in Belgium during the First World War. “It’s impossible to pick out the one I created or the ones that came from Halifax,” I wrote at the time. “Hand-crafted, they have countless tiny imperfections that make them unique, yet at a distance those differences are impossible to see. They form a sea of lives lost. They represent so much effort but look so fragile and impermanent.”

Read more in this post from the Halifax Magazine archives.

COVID transforms Christmas parade
While the pandemic is likely to force the cancellation of many holiday events, organizers of Truro’s Santa Claus parade are figuring out a way to continue the tradition while respecting public health rules. Their solution: stationary floats, parked in a widely spaced area that visitors will be able to stroll through from 2–7 p.m. on Nov. 21.

“We were seeing other municipalities and communities make the decision to close or cancel the events but we felt Truro and Colchester really needed something to lift the spirits,” says organizer Jenn Mantin. Raissa Tetanish has the details for Hub Now.

Correction: An earlier version of this post gave incorrect dates for the event and misspelled Jenn Mantin’s name. Halifax Magazine regrets the errors.

Government announces new Tancook ferry
For years, infrequent and unreliable ferry service has plagued the residents of the Tancook Islands on the South Shore. Yesterday, government announced plans to replace the passenger-only service with a vehicle ferry by the spring of 2022.

“The new vessel will provide shorter, more frequent trips and allow transport trucks and emergency response vehicles to access the islands,” reports Keith Corcoran for LighthouseNow.

Photo: Aleksa Lear

A gift to the future
Ray Titterington devoted uncounted hours to shaping his unique bachelor pad on the Shelburne County coast. With its spectacular setting, hand-carved woodwork, and unique cactus garden, the home is one in a million. But it wasn’t just for him. When he died, he left it to the Nova Scotia Nature Trust, to support its work protecting the province’s natural treasures.

“We did not know Ray. We didn’t know of his interest in the organization,” says executive director Bonnie Sutherland. “He left everything in his possession to the Nova Scotia Nature Trust. It is quite amazing and humbling. Somebody believed in our mission.” Shannon Webb-Campbell explores the remarkable gift in this new East Coast Living feature.

Need to know
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